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Race2innerspace

Well, I may not be racing toward innerspace myself, but our friends at Triton Submarines are. They have entered the quest for reaching the deepest depth of the globe in a submarine of their own built. The depth of this place is about 36,000 feet or roughly about 11 kms deep and is called the Challenger Deep located as part of the Mariana Trench in the western North Pacific Ocean.

Welcome to part two of my story of my first submarine dive. Read the first part here if you missed it.

Actually, truth be told this was not my first submarine dive. In the summer of 2010 I had the pleasure of getting a dive in the Uboat Worx submarine which was exhibited at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show with Brownie’s Yachdiver and you can actually read about it here and even see a small video from that experience. But that particular submarine dive was but a dive on the spot just going a few meters down and just staying there for about a minute or so and then going up again. So this dive with the Triton submarine yesterday in the Bahamas was really the first real dive I have ever been in a submarine and as I wrote in my first part of this story it is also representing the deepest I have ever dived.

As mentioned in part one of this story, we came aboard the private luxury yacht called Mine Games which has one of the Triton Submarines on its aft deck. It is indeed a great set up. Not only can you travel in style and complete luxury, but you can actually also go ahead and do some serious explorations to spots where more than likely nobody has been before you. Mine Games has it own davit that conveniently and beautifully hides away under a hard case cover that when in place acts as a oversize table more or less. When using the davit, this hard case cover simply tilts back to reveal the davit and gives it amble room to maneuver heavy loads such as in this case a Triton Submarine.

Table Conceals Davit

Table Conceals Davit

The Powerful Davit

Table Tilts Back To Reveal The Powerful Davit

And the Triton submarine is just perfect too for this setup. For many reasons actually and too many for me to list right here, but allow me just to mention a few. First of all the Triton submarine has a size that is manageable by a decent size vessel. Most submarines are so large that you need a really large vessel to handle them (a great one might be one like the Allure Shadow). The manageable size makes it not only easier to find a vessel that can be utilized for the exploration but also reduces the costs of same considerably. Furthermore it makes it likewise easier and less expensive to find a davit or crane solution that you can have onboard to aid the hoisting of the submarine on and off. By same token it also requires less people to handle the task involved in operating and prepping for the dives.

Attaching The Submarine To The Hitch

Attaching The Submarine To The Hitch

Hoisting Up The Submarine

Hoisting Up The Submarine

Lifting The Submarine Over The Side

Lifting The Submarine Over The Side

Setting The Submarine Down

Setting The Submarine Down Into The Water

Another great thing about the Triton Submarine is its design that besides being much lighter than most submarines and very much more compact without sacrificing comfort for captain and passengers alike inside the submarine and without compromising on performance, is its ability to exchange passengers resting on the surface. With its great pontoons not only do you rest securely on the surface, but also with its hatch being at the highest point of the submarine with relatively easy access you can enter and exit on the surface and exchange passengers even in somewhat choppy waters – and do so safely.
Most submarines would actually drown or certainly be at great risk of drowning if you opened up its hatch on the surface (not talking about the huge military type submarines here), which also means that you would have to hoist the submarine back onboard every time you would want to exchange passengers. This not only would steal away loads of your time available but would also be adding considerably to all costs and is certainly not very efficient.
A further great benefit of the Triton submarine’s ability to allow for such easy exchange of passengers is also then that you can utilize a tender – or even as we did in Bimini last year, a seadoo jetski – to bring passengers back and forth between the submarine on the surface and the vessel. This safes loads of time and not least fuel, which in this case for the submarine is electricity and which in turns postpones the need for recharging the batteries thus making it possible for you to do more or longer dives.

Passengers are Exchanged On The Surface

Passengers are Exchanged On The Surface Utilizing The Tender

Still to come: Diving in the submarine…

Diving The Triton Submarine

Diving The Triton Submarine

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